Supply and Demand Mens Fashion Accessories

Published: 09th January 2009
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Economic downturn or not, the men's fashion accessories market is grossly under supplied and below par.

Fashion houses and high street stores are trimming back on variety to turn the economic tide, but not without risk, less choice and variety may deliver better dividends, but the demand for difference still grows. And it is growing toward the independent online and high street stores.

They have positioned themselves and building on customer loyalty. Small enough to cater for real time demand and offering a level of service. Department stores are increasingly ill equipped to provide the same.

Staff loyalty and commitment is as important as customer loyalty. Look after your staff and they will look after your customers repeatedly. However the retail industry relies heavily on part time casuals whose commitments lie elsewhere in studies or affording lifestyle.

Plus wages in this industry are comparatively low, providing little incentive.

Meanwhile the generic flavour of menswear stagnates.

The quality suffers as often as designer brands are swallowed up by corporate entities and manufacturing licenses are un-policed.

More damage is being done to brand names by the volume of counterfeit products available online; just spend a little more time researching to determine authenticity and, then you are assured of getting full value.

Vivienne Westwood keeps a very tight rein on authorizing online and traditional retailers. Its like all commodities, if the market is flooded the value will decrease.

At 60 something Westwood is at her creative peak. She is catering to demand from men who seek to differ.

Customer loyalty and staff loyalty is achieved in line with constant observation of consumer demands.

The true value lies in the product and, laid out include, silk ties, cufflinks, scarves, belts, wallets, lapel badges, jewellery, pocket squares and bracelets, plus for the younger and more daring, ear decoration, rings and bracelets.

In all, independents have not missed the plot like some larger department stores. They remain in constant contact with customers and deliver in accordance with demand, without sacrificing variety, choice and quality.

When you don't have to report to a board of directors or navigate your way through a labyrinth of middle management you are able to focus on the more important issues like design, sourcing, manufacture and supply.

In spite of the inevitable global control that large retailers will command, there's always going to be a sizable niche that can only be filled by dedicated independents such as patrick mcmurray.com.

We don't have to provide a lot of references to back up our argument. The evidence is easy enough to find. Just go on line and see how hard it is to find authentic, current collections by well known brands. Then go traipsing around the malls and street shops and you will get an indication of the generic nature of men's fashion clothing.

Now this is where we make a recommendation before concluding with an interesting anecdote. Have a look at these designer ties. Remembering they are not all the same, one size fits all the better ones are engineered for countless good knottage.

A little History.
The legendary celebrity tailor Douglas (The Italian Job) Hayward dies. A new Archive Room at No 1 Savile Row is curated by James Sherwood and inaugurated in honour of the late Robert Gieve. In March 2008 The London Cut exhibition is invited to show at the British Ambassador's Residence in Tokyo. A satellite exhibition then travels to Isetan where Savile Row dominates the prestigious store's windows and exhibition space. A three one-hour documentary mapping a year in the life of Savile Row is aired on BBC4 while BBC2 follow The London Cut to Tokyo for a further British fashion series to be aired in autumn.

The economic downturn is no excuse to undersupply a demanding market.

Our thoughtfully developed online shop is geared towards providing luxury enamel designer cufflinks Skillfully finished by hand.


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